Invitation to Cancer The Speaker Details for the Cancer Talk
 
 
Cancer arises from one single cell. The transformation from a normal cell into a tumour cell is a multistage process, typically a progression from a pre-cancerous lesion to malignant tumours. These changes are the result of the interaction between a person's genetic factors and three categories of external agents, including: physical carcinogens, such as ultraviolet and ionizing radiation chemical carcinogens, such as asbestos, components of tobacco smoke, aflatoxin (a food contaminant) and arsenic (a drinking water contaminant) biological carcinogens, such as infections from certain viruses, bacteria or parasites.

Some examples of infections associated with certain cancers:

Viruses: hepatitis B and liver cancer, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Kaposi sarcoma.
Bacteria: Helicobacter pylori and stomach cancer.
Parasites: schistosomiasis and bladder cancer.

Ageing is another fundamental factor for the development of cancer. The incidence of cancer rises dramatically with age, most likely due to a buildup of risks for specific cancers that increase with age. The overall risk accumulation is combined with the tendency for cellular repair mechanisms to be less effective as a person grows older.
Tobacco use, alcohol use, low fruit and vegetable intake, and chronic infections from hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and some types of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) are leading risk factors for cancer in low- and middle-income countries. Cervical cancer, which is caused by HPV, is a leading cause of cancer death among women in low-income countries.

In high-income countries, tobacco use, alcohol use, and being overweight or obese are major risk factors for cancer.

 
Cancer is a leading cause of death globally. The World Health Organization estimates that 7.6 million people died of cancer in 2005 and 84 million people will die in the next 10 years if action is not taken. More than 70% of all cancer death occurs in low-middle income countries, where resources available for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer are limited or non-existent.

Here are the statistics.


 
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